APPG Chair Ken Clarke has today criticised the government’s attempt to bury its response to the Intelligence and Security Committee reports into detainee mistreatment and rendition.

Middle East Eye reveals today that British intelligence agencies fed questions to the interrogators of a captured terrorism suspect whom they knew was being seriously mistreated in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, and ministers then relied upon his answers to help justify the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

As covered in today's Financial Times, the APPG has responded to the public consultation on the UK's anti-torture policy, by calling the policy 'unfit for purpose and insufficient to prevent a repeat of UK involvement in rendition and torture.'

APPG Founder, Lord Tyrie, speaking in the House of Lords on the occasion of his maiden speech, has renewed his calls for a judge-led inquiry into UK involvement in extraordinary rendition.

The North Carolina Commission of Inquiry on Torture has published the report of its investigation into North Carolina’s involvement in torture and rendition.

Ministers are accused of routinely providing legal cover for the intelligence services where there is a possibility of information being extracted through torture abroad, the Guardian reports today.

Speaking today, APPG Chair Ken Clarke criticised the government's failure to meet its own 60-day deadline to announce whether or not it will hold a judge-led inquiry into the UK’s involvement in rendition and torture.

The Investigatory Powers Commissioner, Sir Adrian Fulford, has today announced that there will be a public consultation on the government's anti-torture policy, known as the Consolidated Guidance.